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Electric Paradise by LakeFX Electric Paradise by LakeFX
A fast moving spring storm in Paradise Valley near Emigrant, Montana.
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:iconfigit090:
Figit090 Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2010  Professional Photographer
I like this shot a lot, beautiful color and depth.
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:icondev-shooter:
dev-shooter Featured By Owner Jun 7, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
like a 3 dimension:D supeeerb!!!
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:iconbehrfeet:
Behrfeet Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2010
Gorgeous! And I even know exactly where that is! South of Livingston .. right?
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:iconlakefx:
LakeFX Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
Yes! South to about half way to the Wyoming border, just past Emigrant.
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:iconbehrfeet:
Behrfeet Featured By Owner Jun 3, 2010
definitely a wicked good shot. :thumbsup:
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:icondrewhopper:
DrewHopper Featured By Owner Sep 25, 2009  Professional Photographer
Amazing shot. May I ask what lens you used here?
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:iconlakefx:
LakeFX Featured By Owner Sep 27, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
thank you! It's an original Tokina 28-80mm F2.8-2.8. There have been several updates to this lens but this particular version is no longer manufactured. I purchased mine off of eBay, unfortunately i no longer have it due to theft earlier this year. I miss it dearly.

[link]
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:icondrewhopper:
DrewHopper Featured By Owner Sep 28, 2009  Professional Photographer
I'm getting the Canon 70-200 f/2.8 non IS for my birthday, nice little gift from my parents :D
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:iconcschoeps:
cschoeps Featured By Owner Feb 8, 2009
Super! Did you use a lightning detector or nd-filter?
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:iconlakefx:
LakeFX Featured By Owner Feb 17, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Actually I used a polarizer as an ND-filter. I've found under most situations it works perfectly the same as an ND!
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:iconcopperarabian:
copperarabian Featured By Owner Jan 23, 2009  Student Photographer
that's so good /><}}^> lighting is hard to get a picture of :D
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:iconthedonutking:
thedonutking Featured By Owner Jan 15, 2009
that's absolutely gorgeous :)
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:iconlakefx:
LakeFX Featured By Owner Jan 19, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you!
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:icondatazoid:
datazoid Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
Spectacular. I'm jealous of your scenery. :D
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:iconlakefx:
LakeFX Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
I wish I could call it 'mine' i drove 1750 miles to get to this place. I was just in the right place at the right time! Love your lightning photos too. To be honest, you have much better stuff to put in your lightning photos than i do. I have tall trees all the way around, and i have to drive quite some distance (about 30 miles) to get some water or something cool in a storm photo.
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:icondatazoid:
datazoid Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
I guess. :D

I find the landscape here to be ugly and always tends to look the same. I'm always excited when I can photograph storms against mountains or any landscape that isn't dead flat and colourless. :)

Your photos are awesome. :)

Thanks for your kind words. :)
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:iconwynnter89:
wynnter89 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2009
thats great
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:iconununpentium115:
UnUnPentium115 Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2009
Hey, I saw your comment on Nzeman's lightning photography. Yours is very good as well. I find it interesting that your picture isn't overexposed, although you took it for 15 seconds. Next summer, when we have thunderstorms in Austria again, I will try to take pictures of lightnings as well. Can you give any advice?
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:iconlakefx:
LakeFX Featured By Owner Jan 12, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Thanks! One big detail not shown is that i had a polarizing filter on the lens to darken the scene. I also used a shutter chord to prevent vibration or motion blur. The less light you let into the lens, the longer the exposure time you can get away with. Most DSLR cameras can meter all the way to 30 seconds. Initially while it was brighter and the storm was further away, I did everything i could to get it up to several seconds, 2,3,5 or more is better. I used the lowest ISO speed, higher f-stops, plus the polarizing filter. After the 5 or 8 or even 15 seconds of exposure, the scene is fully exposed like any other photograph. The meter should tell you that your settings are correct for the available light so you know the scene won't be to under or over exposed. In that 8 to 15 seconds however, the hope is that a lightning strike or two will have occurred. So the trick here is to take pictures over and over. I used continuous shooting mode and held the shutter remote down for several photos at a time. The storm moves, changes in intensity, and changes color or contrast, so I would adjust the camera and exposure settings every few minutes, take more pictures, adjust, repeat.

Out of about 55 photos that i took, perhaps 15 minutes of shooting total, about 20 of them had strikes. only 6 of these were completely within the frame. of that 2 pictures had photogenic strikes. I have both of the up on deviant art, here's the other one: [link]


And here's another storm using the same principals in another set of conditions!

[link]

[link]
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:iconfigit090:
Figit090 Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2010  Professional Photographer
very cool, thanks for the explanations! I have to try this...too bad lightning storms are rather rare where I am.

Were you worried at all about getting struck yourself? That would be my only concern =p
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:iconlakefx:
LakeFX Featured By Owner Jun 8, 2010  Hobbyist Photographer
This strike was one of the last before I took cover. This strike is probably more than 5 miles away. After some experience with this you can minimize and balance risk/reward with lightning photos. There's definitely a point where you can be too close, but knowing when too close is can be tricky. My rule of them is anything within 2 miles is too close. and I'm already packing up when they are within 3 miles.
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:iconfigit090:
Figit090 Featured By Owner Jun 21, 2010  Professional Photographer
That's cool, thanks for the tips, I appreciate it! :)
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:iconununpentium115:
UnUnPentium115 Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
Thanks a lot for your very well developed reply :)

I knew that I needed to take a picture with a very low ISO, a long exposure and higher f-stops. I just wasn't sure how to not get it overexposed.
So therefore you used a polarizing filter? That's interesting! I have one but I didn't know that you can also use it to darken your picture. I often heard something of GND Filters like user "angelreich" uses them a lot. Those are definetely to darken the scene. However, I really find it interesting that a polarizing filter can give you this effect too.

Btw, I :+fav:ed one of your pictures. This is the one I like most, because you can see the enlighted area around the lightning so well.

Thanks again :)
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:iconlakefx:
LakeFX Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009  Hobbyist Photographer
Thank you! Yes polarizing filters can be used just like a GND filter which makes them pretty versatile. However there are some instances where they shouldn't be used, like on rainbows or certain atmospheric phenomenon, they literally disappear from the photograph if you use a polarizer. lightning is just fine though! The best way to stay away from overexposing is to use the metering inside the camera. Even in manual mode it will caution you as to whether your settings are going to work. If you have an apreture priority setting, this is the best one to use in this type of photograph. You can adjust the f-stop, the camera magically adjusts the exposure time. the darker the skies get the further you lower the f-stop until it's optimal for your lens. when you can't lower the f-stop any further, you can raise the ISO or simply remove the GND or polarizer to get more light.
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:iconununpentium115:
UnUnPentium115 Featured By Owner Jan 13, 2009
Great, I will just use the polarizer and start with a f-stop of around 14 or 16. That should be enough to have an exposure time of some 30seconds. Maybe even the bulb mode makes sense if it is very dark. With the LCD-batteryhandle which I'm going to buy for the camera I could also adjust the shutter time in seconds. So I could technically have a shutter time of 60 seconds if the scenery is dark enough.

Anyway, thanks for sharing your knowledge!
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:iconlindacai:
lindacai Featured By Owner Dec 14, 2008
the shutter speed must be very slow to capture this! cool~
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Submitted on
December 9, 2008
Image Size
1.5 MB
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3888×2592
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1,496
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Camera Data

Make
Canon
Model
Canon EOS 40D
Shutter Speed
15/1 second
Aperture
F/14.0
Focal Length
28 mm
ISO Speed
100
Date Taken
Jun 1, 2008, 9:46:07 PM

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